Saturday, May 14, 2016

Area Historic Brickyards

As a reminder of the key role the Tchefuncte River played in the industry and commercial trade of the late 19th and early 20th century, sometimes remnants of brickyards would be found while developers built riverside subdivisions. 


In 1973, such a brickyard was found in a section of Riverwood being constructed, and local historians tried to figure out which brickyard it was. While the St. Joe brickyard north of Slidell is still famous today, the many brickyards in the Covington area, several of which were responsible for providing the building materials for New Orleans, were for the most part closed down, abandoned and forgotten.

Click on the image below to view a larger version of the article. 






In the excerpt below from page 108 of Steve Ellis' book on St. Tammany Parish history , this is what he had to say:


St. Joe Brick Works

Founded in 1891, and purchased in 1895 by Peter W. Schneider  when he acquired the small hand-operated plant, St. Joe Brick Works, Inc. has been under continuous operation for 120 years, and by the Schneiders for 116 years.  This plant located 40 miles north of New Orleans is the oldest family brick manufacturers east of the Mississippi River making colonial moulded face brick using wood moulds. 

To read the history of the St. Joe Brickyards in Slidell, CLICK HERE.


A display of various bricks at HJ Smiths Sons General Merchandise Store Museum in Covington. 


The 1926 Charter of St. Joe Brick Works